Posts from Hogan Lovells

Arbitrating business and human rights disputes: uncharted territory

Last October, we wrote about the proposal by a working group of international law specialists to use arbitration to resolve disputes that arise out of human rights abuses involving businesses. Since then, the proposal has evolved into a project led by The Hague Institute for Global Justice to draft a set of international arbitration rules … Continue reading Arbitrating business and human rights disputes: uncharted territory

Reform of the Arbitration Act 1996 and confidentiality: it’s not all about an opt-in

In December 2017, the Law Commission launched its Thirteenth Programme of Law Reform. In it, the Law Commission suggests that it might be time to reform the English Arbitration Act 1996 (AA 1996).

Late twist to the Commisimpex saga as French Supreme Court reverses its position on state immunity from execution

On 10 January 2018, the French Supreme Court issued a second decision in the Commisimpex v Democratic Republic of Congo case, shifting its position on state immunity from execution. In the light of the new Sapin II law, the court held that a waiver of immunity from execution has to be both specific and express … Continue reading Late twist to the Commisimpex saga as French Supreme Court reverses its position on state immunity from execution

Petrotrin v Samsung: lessons learned from a challenge under section 67 Arbitration Act 1996

As the UK continues to enjoy some of the coldest weather of its winter so far, why not visit the Caribbean? Or, more precisely, the English High Court’s decision last November in Petroleum Company of Trinidad & Tobago Limited v Samsung Engineering Trinidad Co. Ltd, which dealt with a challenge to a tribunal’s partial award … Continue reading Petrotrin v Samsung: lessons learned from a challenge under section 67 Arbitration Act 1996

Surveys show appetite for TMT arbitration… but cheaper, faster, better

Technology, Media and Telecommunications (TMT) disputes have been attracting a growing level of interest in the last few years. Welcome to the global digital age: technology is everywhere, and this ubiquity is expected to give rise to a commensurate number of disputes.

The Morocco-Nigeria BIT: a new breed of investment treaty?

On 30 August 2017, the Moroccan Parliament ratified the Morocco-Nigeria bilateral investment treaty (BIT), which now awaits ratification by Nigeria. This treaty, part of a suite of agreements signed between Morocco and Nigeria at a ceremony in Casablanca in December 2016, is intended to herald a “strategic partnership” at a time when the two countries … Continue reading The Morocco-Nigeria BIT: a new breed of investment treaty?

Arbitration: a new forum for business and human rights disputes?

On 27-29 November 2017, the United Nations Forum on Business and Human Rights will convene in Geneva. Its central theme: Access to Effective Remedy. In line with this shifting focus by the international community on the third pillar of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), a working group of international law specialists published … Continue reading Arbitration: a new forum for business and human rights disputes?

Will life sciences provide a growth injection for international arbitration?

The use of international arbitration has expanded over the years to encompass a wide array of sectors. For example, while the majority of financial services disputes still end up in court, many of them are submitted to arbitration. Of the London Court of International Arbitration’s (LCIA’s) caseload in 2016, 20% comprised of such disputes. This … Continue reading Will life sciences provide a growth injection for international arbitration?

Applying for summary procedures in international arbitration: striking the balance

The scope of arbitrators’ powers to order summary procedures is open to debate. Any application for summary measures requires careful consideration of the possible benefits to be gained from a successful application on the one hand, and the uncertainty associated with doing so on the other.

Arbitrator bias: should we judge a book by its cover?

Tribunals have a fundamental duty to act fairly and impartially under section 33(1)(a) of the English Arbitration Act (AA 1996).

Legal advice privilege in England and the “closest connection” test

English-seated arbitral tribunals have a great degree of flexibility in determining the applicable rules of privilege.

Arbitral Women: Winning Communication

“You’re the voice, try and understand it, Make a noise and make it clear.” John Farnham On 2 February 2017, Hogan Lovells hosted a joint event with ArbitralWomen entitled “Winning Communication” in which a panel, including Julianne Hughes-Jennett, partner at Hogan Lovells, Tessa Wood, Senior Voice & Communication Coach at City Academy, Wendy Miles QC, global head … Continue reading Arbitral Women: Winning Communication